Grant fund opens to applicants

News Posted 23/02/18
Sussex Lund, the grant programme established by Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, has opened for 2018 applications.

Sussex Lund supports small scale, practical projects that improve the ecology and landscape of the High Weald area of outstanding natural beauty (AONB). More than £400,000 has been allocated since the fund launched in 2016.

The High Weald AONB Partnership, which is administering the fund in collaboration with Lund Trust, is inviting farmers and landowners, charities, community groups, schools, churches and councils to apply for grants of between £500 and £10,000.

Grants of more than £10,000 are available for groups of two or more applicants working in collaboration – for example, an application to fund shared equipment or machinery, or projects that cross landowner boundaries.

Sussex Lund has supported a number of landowners and farmers across the High Weald since the fund launched in 2016.

Successful projects have included hedgelaying and hedgerow restoration to protect the AONB’s historic field characteristics, using traditional techniques and local craftspeople. These projects involved a range of activities such as coppicing overgrown hedges and gapping them up.

The grant programme has also funded the creation and improvement of wildflower meadows using High Weald native species. As well as creating vital new habitats for pollinators, this grassland can then be taken as a hay crop.

Other projects include extensive removal of invasive species from woodland such as rhododendron and laurel – improving both access and biodiversity – as well as planting trees in historic parkland.

The deadline for applications is Sunday 15 April 2018. Applications are welcome from any organisation or individual for projects which improve the landscape and have a public benefit. The project should take place within the High Weald AONB boundary.

Potential applicants are encouraged to discuss their proposal with the High Weald team on 01424 723014 or email

Photo: Removing invasive species from woodland. ©Rowan Purkis

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